Positivity

What If…

We are all a product of our past. As individuals, what we are today is a function of the cumulative experiences through our careers and upbringing. It has shaped much of our outlook and beliefs.

This history defines the depth of experience and credentials we have as individuals. It shapes our thoughts, beliefs, behaviour, and culture. Our history is something of which we should be proud. Who we are today was significantly shaped by the people we looked up to, the examples set by our elders and those who came before us.

If we were to compare ourselves to a teenager, they wouldn’t have the same outlook on life, nor would they have the same mindset towards life. Their behaviour and thought processes would not be defined by the past but probably more suited to their immediate needs and want.

Likewise, comparisons between a start-up and an established company often invoke the romanticized image that the start-up is agile and nimble. In contrast, the established company is slow and lazy. The reality is that there are fors and againsts in each model. Start-ups are possibly, more geared toward future technologies and markets. Established organizations have a track record of proven delivery. They also have learned how to avoid the inevitable risks in business and projects.

We know, however, that the world never stands still. If anything, the external environment appears to be getting faster and more unexpected than ever before.

It makes sense that for organizations to remain relevant in a changing external environment, they must embrace a posture of change. This is a continuum. The changing environment never stops. And so, business structures, systems and operating models need to change.

We know, however, that the world never stands still. If anything, the external environment appears to be getting faster and more unexpected than ever before.

Organizations are, however, typically always in lag mode. Unless the organization is the rare exception that accurately anticipates a change or, even better, is the instigator of the change in your market, they typically all lag behind the changing dimensions of the external environment.

Either way, change has become a constant feature of a successful organization.

But here’s the rub – most organizations don’t like change. Their systems and processes are typically set up to ensure repeatability and reliability. By definition, these systems and processes are designed NOT to change.

So, how do you reconcile these two competing forces, the need to change to remain relevant in the future against the need for stability and reliability?

Using some “what if” thinking about ourselves might be part of the answer.

So, imagine for one moment that.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.